Tag: real estate advice

08
May

Market Climate Map Released for LA Sales Volume

The MLS just released the First Quarter Market Climate Map for the Greater Los Angeles Area. This map and chart (See below) compare the LA sales volume of single-family homes from the first quarter of 2014 to the first quarter of 2015 in the different areas of Los Angeles. Click on the image below to zoom in.

LA Sales Volume

If you would like more information about the current real estate market in your neighborhood, or would like a obligation free home value quote, please do no hesitate to contact me!

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29
Apr

Homeowner Tips: Contractor Liability

contractor liability
I often get asked about Contractor Liability from friends and clients. If as a homeowner you retain a licensed contractor who employs persons to fix your roof, paint or make repairs to your home and if the employee falls or otherwise injures himself, do you have liability?
The answer is yes, if you know of a potentially dangerous condition. For example, if a beam was rotten or roof supports were compromised and you failed to warn of the condition. If you have no knowledge of the condition, you may not have a theoretical liability but if there is catastrophic injuries, you may be sued nevertheless.
Your homeowners policy may not provide sufficient coverage for your protection so you might wish to consider an umbrella policy in case of a serious and unforeseen claim against you as a homeowner.

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02
Apr

Family Moving Tips

moving tips

We’ve got a few moving tips for you, because let’s face it, the very word “MOVING” conjures up feelings of either excitement or total and utter panic. My family has spent most of the month balanced somewhere between the two emotions. On the one hand, we are very excited to start fresh in a newer, larger house that we created from the ground up. It’s on a lovely street and only a few blocks from where we now live in Cheviot Hills.

Inhabiting this new home, however, is the light at the end of the proverbial tunnel. Before getting to live there, much work in our current home had to be done. Unless you are the one in a million

who lives in an immaculate home with zero flaws, for the rest of the 99.9 percent of us, getting a house into shape before selling it can be all consuming. Eliminating clutter, touching up paint, sprucing up the landscaping and keeping it neat is no easy task, especially if you have young children.

“Eliminating clutter, touching up paint, sprucing up the landscaping and keeping it neat is no easy task, especially if you have young children.”

We had actually done a good job maintaining the infrastructure of our 1920s home but still asked Julie Manz, a professional stager that is part of my team, to assess what we had to do to get the inside ready for “show time.” She walked my wife and I from room to room and like a general on the battlefield, authoritatively commanded what furniture should stay and what should go. She pointed out dings that needed repairing and personal artifacts that had no business being on display for the world to see.

Yes, this is my profession and I am an expert in all matters real estate, however, you know what they say about doctors being the worst patients? When it comes to turning a critical eye to my own home, it was hard to be impartial especially when every item I own is a beautiful, treasured piece of priceless perfection!

Clearly we needed serious marching orders and Julie whipped us into shape. It actually felt good to let go of some things we had no use for and weeks after starting this process, on our first Sunday open, our beautiful home was almost unrecognizable it was so pristine. We received multiple offers that day and felt the success was in large part due to our preparing as best we could to present the finest product possible.

Our house sold quickly (the easy part), but the next obstacle: to continue the arduous task of further decluttering before actually boxing everything up to move out. My wife would not entertain my usual delaying tactic of saying, “Let’s just pack it all and we’ll deal with it when we get there.”

Nope — the time to get rid of everything non-essential and non-sentimental was now. Not an easy task but the reward would be worth the effort. It would feel so good to move to our clean slate of a home and start amassing all priceless, perfect treasures all over again. Because that’s what we do. We collect, we admire, we enjoy, we put in the garage and then we forget until the next time we decide to move.

“The time to get rid of everything non-essential and non-sentimental was now.”

Hopefully, though, we are officially settled down and won’t have to go through this again for a long time.

When it’s all said and done, the destination will be worth all the trouble, but getting there really

isn’t half the fun.

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01
Apr

Cheviot Hills/ Beverlywood Homeowner Tips: Sidewalk TLC

beverlywood homeowner sidewalk

We’ve all seen those patches of sidewalks with considerable bumps, gaps and an unlevel, difficult surface. So, as a Cheviot Hills or Beverlywood homeowner, who is responsible when buckled or hazardous sidewalks abutting a homeowner’s lot are the cause of a third person’s injury? Attorney Michael Harris describes the standard rules that apply to this particular rough road of home ownership.

  • The abutting owner generally is not liable to maintain the sidewalk or warn of sidewalk hazards.
  • An abutting owner may be liable if the danger is caused by the owner, such as leaving grease, vegetable matter or debris on the sidewalk.
  • An abutting owner may be liable if shrubbery or overhanging tree limbs from the abutting owner’s property encroaches on the sidewalk.
  • If tree roots are making the sidewalks defective, the abutting owner is generally not liable where the tree is growing on the parkway between the sidewalk and the street, but the owner may be liable where the tree with the offending roots is growing on the abutting property owner’s lot.
  • If the tree in the parkway is planted by the lot owner, he would be responsible for sidewalk damage done by the tree.

If there is a sidewalk you know of that is in dire need of repair, you can call the City of Los Angeles’ Service Request at 1(800) 996-CITY or 3-1-1.

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